Run your business and enjoy the World Cup

Posted on: 17 June 2014

With a month of exhilarating and heart-stopping football here we’re all organising our diaries so as not to miss the action.

For small business owners, this is a painful process. Without buildings full of people around you to take up the reigns while you get involved, how do you make sure you enjoy the World Cup AND keep your business going?

Here’s how you and your team can continue to satisfy your customer’s needs and even grow your business between 12 June and 13 July.

Keep up with the games

  • Set out clear guidelines for yourself as well as your staff for taking time off to watch the games (or recover from them). If you’re up front about what is and is not acceptable (such as coming in before 9am when people have gone home early the night before to catch their team’s 5pm game) you’re less likely to get a painful spike in sick leave and drop in productivity.
  • You could set up a TV area so you and your staff can enjoy watching the football together during breaks or even after working hours. Watching the games together could make your staff feel more valued and even increase staff morale.
  • Download the BBC’s ‘World Cup breakfast’ video every morning that will sum up the previous evening’s events. You could share the updates with your staff or if you’re on the road it will enable you to schedule your evening journeys to catch live coverage on Radio 5 Live.

Satisfy customer needs

  • Those working in the catering industry can give their menu a football makeover with national dishes from participating countries. The World Cup could be a good opportunity to test new flavours or create new dishes and ask customers for feedback. Knowing that they have helped tailor your offering will improve buy in and help bring them in more regularly.
  • Hairdressers that do home visits can use social media to offer promotions to customers and their friends who book several appointments together. If you make sure their booking coincides with a game, you can all watch the match while you cut their hair.

Grow your business

  • Organise a team social at a local pub for an early evening England game (eg 5pm Tuesday 24 June v Costa Rica). Gather everyone together for a team meeting an hour before the game to recognise hard work and reward success, putting a football theme onto awards if possible. Use the event to boost morale, which will help improve productivity.
  • If you’re based in central London and have some networking to do, head down to Summer of Sport at Exchange Square to watch the action on the big screen and develop your business relationships by inviting along some key prospects (who you know will enjoy the football too!).
  • Involve your community, via email or social media, in conversations about the games. Use it as an excuse to get in touch, find something in common and achieve some objectives, like getting feedback or securing that sale you’ve been working towards since Christmas.
  • If the team you support crashes out, initiate a ‘plan b’ that prevents your World Cup activity from dying a sudden death. Pick your remaining favourite team to win and find ways of linking that country to your business (eg if you’re a florist, offer two for one on tulips to support the Netherlands).

Just a final word of warning. If you’re not an official sponsor of the World Cup, you’re prohibited from using the logo and several other Official Marks. So be careful in your World Cup related marketing that you don’t infringe any copyright.


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